Calling the Skies Navigates Us Through a State of, 'Delirium'



Hailing from Oakland, California, the members of Calling the Skies grew up in the vibrant and diverse Bay Area music scene.


Taking influence from a myriad of genres, Calling the Skies have crafted their own unique sound mixing the aggression of metal, the speed of punk, and hooks that echo pop hits and classic rock. With the release of their debut EP 'Delirium,' the band is eager to embrace their bright and shining future as musical creators.


Taking in the boisterous sounds of ‘Delirium,’ tracks like the introductory, “Days Long Gone,” have us hearing weighty synths that play into the speakers as the intensity is amplified with chugging guitar riffs, and a deep sense of urgency. Following suit with the EP’s fourth record “Mortal,” the musical elements that form these tracks have us transported to a mind-altering state that has us peaking our head into a newfound dimension of polished grunge. There’s a brilliance that lies within the formation of musical components, as the amalgamation has us thriving on what Calling the Skies has to offer. From yearning timbres that perform words of passion, the manner in which we’re easily transported from chaotic bliss to laidback anticipation is truly remarkable.


“Get Through This,” comes in second on the tracklist, and we’re immediately grooving along to the resonated bassline that resides in this composition. Complemented by the rhythmic essence of the colossal drum patterns, we find that this particular song falls into a deeper state of pop-punk vibrancy with the heavy-hitting elements encompassing a polished finish that has us eager to explore the progressions before us.


Although the somber spirit of “Endless Nights,” carries a protruding melancholy, we hear this track follow in the footsteps of “Get Through This.” Dousing us in dynamic instrumentation that makes you want to two-step where you’re standing, the lyrical content performed through the speakers allows us to latch onto the depth that the storytelling holds within itself.