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Prince Amine Grows Roots With “Afrikan Boy”


Prince Amine, an artist defined by his multicultural journey, injects an impressive blend of Afrobeats, R&B, and Hip Hop into his latest album, "Afrikan Boy." Born in Morocco, raised in Spain, and later transplanted to Montreal, Canada, Prince Amine's unique cultural experiences are imprinted into his soundscape, creating a vibrant and distinctively diverse musical identity. Influenced by the legendary Motown and R&B melodies shared by his performer father, Prince Amine started as a young artist in high school, and today, his success reverberates in the hip-hop scene from Montreal to the United States.


His previous albums, such as "XVIII" and "Hram Vybez," were stepping stones to the creation of "Afrikan Boy." His hard work and dedication to these projects were noticed, as evidenced by "Hram Vybez" reaching #9 on the NACC Hip Hop Chart. In 2020, PrinceAmine released a concept album, "Doubted Child," exploring the ebbs and flows of an emerging artist's journey. His tireless efforts to diversify his musicality led him to produce a new song each month in 2021, ranging from hip hop and rap to drill, kompa, and R&B. With his evolving musical endeavors, he has now focused on Afrobeats with the release of "Afrikan Boy."


With the debut of "Afrikan Boy," PrinceAmine offers an undeniably Afrocentric soundscape filled with tribal beats and organic instruments. The tribal essence exudes from each song, wrapping listeners in a warm, rhythmic embrace that pulls at the very roots of Afrikan musical tradition. The smooth vocals present Prince Amine as a melody-forward artist unafraid to expose his delivery's vulnerability. A delicate balance is achieved in each song through the integration of heavy kicks, sharp piano lines, crisp shakers, and smooth guitars over the laid-back, calming beats.


"for my people" is an authentic testament to Prince Amine's roots, a soulful homage to his people filled with the raw rhythmic cadence of Afrobeats. The emotional vulnerability is again seen in "On the Road," where PrinceAmine, with the relaxed yet dynamic beats, describes a nomadic love story that is both alluring and bittersweet. "leeches," a gritty commentary on materialistic desires, stands out with its catchy beats, interwoven with a narrative on the allure of money. In contrast, "Bomaye" delves into a more passionate and romantic facet of Prince Amine's songwriting, with lyrics rich in sensuous imagery layered over a mellow rhythm.


"neighborhood love" offers an intimate exploration of romance and desire, its mellow rhythm juxtaposed against lyrics full of fiery yearning. "shayo" plays with the intoxicating thrill of the party scene, its energetic beats and lively lyrics painting a picture of the vibrant nightlife. The songs "Spell on Me" and "love potion" further delve into the realms of romance and enchantment, their languid beats and heartfelt lyrics creating an aura of passionate mystique. "bout my life" stands as a poignant autobiographical narrative, an intimate sharing of PrinceAmine's personal journey and struggles set against the rhythmic backdrop of Afrobeats. Finally, "Pura Vida" offers a reflective conclusion to the album, its lyrics grappling with loss and mourning yet maintaining a resilient spirit of hope against the rhythmic cadence of the music.


This intimate exploration of diverse themes, from personal struggles and reflection to love and societal commentary, all packaged within the magnetic allure of Afrobeats, affirms "Afrikan Boy" as a testament to Prince Amine's evolving artistry. This album hints at a promising future for Prince Amine as he continues to expand his musical repertoire while staying rooted in his unique multicultural identity.



Welcome to BuzzMusic, Prince Amine. Cheers to letting your soul shine on your latest album, "Afrikan Boy," featuring a strong blend of Afrobeat vibes. Can you share how you developed the specific sound that permeates the album? What guided you to choose this sound as the primary theme for "Afrikan Boy?"


Aye, much love! It came with much studying and opening my ears to many types of artists and different rhythms from specific regions. The feel and vibrant energy made me go with this sound. It inspired me to get groovin' and set my pen on my paper.


Your lyrics in the "Afrikan Boy" album often expose personal experiences and vulnerability. Could you share the songwriting process for this album and how you decided to incorporate such personal elements in your lyrics?


The process for this album was rather fluid for me. Speaking from experience, telling stories, and letting everything out was second nature. I decided I wanted to switch things up and speak up about things I’ve lived because I came from being someone who always kept things to myself.


I worked on everything from scratch alongside my talented and longtime boy Frank, a stage name known as Frank'emcy. He has that music in his blood, just like me, and we went through trial and error until we felt inspired and funky enough by the production. We worked with other producers on some tracks to infuse their style, like the very talented Kenzhelo, who I call Kenzulu, for "Pura Vida" and PrinceK, who worked on “Neighborhood Love,” a true genius in that R&B and kompa world. Also, I'm a big fan of strings, so we tried to tap into that with Greg and Noah, two highly talented guitarists.


"Afrikan Boy" shows that the Afro-centric beats and organic instruments significantly influence the album's overall mood. Could you describe how you and your production team chose and created these beats to enhance the album's message and feel?


I worked on everything from scratch alongside my talented and longtime boy Frank, stage name known as Frank'emcy. He has that music in his blood just like myself and we went through trial and error until we felt inspired and funky enough by the production. We worked with other producers on some tracks to infuse their own style, like the very talented Kenzhelo, who I call Kenzulu, for "Pura Vida" and PrinceK, who worked on “Neighborhood Love”, a true genius in that R&B and kompa world. Also I'm a big fan of strings so we made sure to tap into that with Greg and Noah, two highly talented guitarists.


How has the multicultural influence from Morocco, Spain, and Canada, deeply ingrained in your personal and musical journey, contributed to the shaping of "Afrikan Boy?"


Growing up being surrounded by so many different cultures and practices truly enriched me as a person. As an artist I took all of that and embraced it and created something so unique yet familiar to many. Damn that was deep, I sounded philosophical with that one.


Moving forward, how do you envision the growth and evolution of your music? Do you anticipate future albums like "Afrikan Boy" that focus on a specific genre or cultural influence, or are you planning to explore new genres and styles?


I see my music going beyond genius. So well written and executed. I just see myself levelling up like crazy from here. Just being able to work with people who are more experienced than I am will help me grow. I’m looking forward to the big leagues baby. Top 1, Doubted Child to the world. But for now I plan on staying in this genre and thugging it out. But I would love to be bouncing to different sounds as well and collaborating with different artists and producers.


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